ARLT

The Association for Latin Teaching

respice prospice

ARLT Latin Reading Competition

 2019 - results

 RESULTS

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Senior section:

1= Esme Sayal

Nottingham Girls High School

mp3

1= James Critchley

Royal Grammar School, Newcastle

mp3

2   Jemima Barreto

Royal Grammar School, Newcastle

mp3

Highly commended

 Minjae Joh,

NLCS Jeju


Tara Desai

King Edward VI High


Intermediate Section

1= Karen Guo,  

Independent

mp3

1= Ffion Shute

Independent

mp3

2   Angelina Lee

NLCS Jeju

mp3

3= Kae Kaneko    

NLCS Jeju

mp3

3= Bering Edwards

St Andrew’s Episcopal, Austin, Texas

mp3

Highly commended

Giorgio Rossetto,

Landmark International School


Gabriel Penez- Pineda

East London Science School


Allegra Irakoze

King Edward VI High


Alexandra Heasmer-Jones

Ellesmere College


Eleanor Busby

Manchester High School for Girls


Junior section

1 Christina Rhoden-Lopez

Burntwood School  

mp3

2 Sara Rigat

Landmark International School

mp3

3= Aiden Choi

NLCS Jeju

mp3

3=  Brian Jeong,

NLCS Jeju

mp3

3= Todd Rees-Pullman

Packwood Haugh

mp3

3= Etty Sisson,  

Loughborough High School  

mp3

3= Rae-eun Lee

NLCS Jeju

mp3

Highly commended

Tom Thurstan,

Packwood Haugh


Titas Zitkevicius

East London Science School


Adjudicators’ report:

Senior  Text:

Virgil, Aeneid, Aeneid 4 279-295


 At vero Aeneas aspectu obmutuit amens,

arrectaeque horrore comae et vox faucibus haesit.     280

ardet abire fuga dulcisque relinquere terras,

attonitus tanto monitu imperioque deorum.

heu quid agat? quo nunc reginam ambire furentem

audeat adfatu? quae prima exordia sumat?

atque animum nunc huc celerem nunc dividit illuc       285

in partisque rapit varias perque omnia versat.

haec alternanti potior sententia visa est:

Mnesthea Sergestumque vocat fortemque Serestum,

classem aptent taciti sociosque ad litora cogant,

arma parent et quae rebus sit causa novandis            290

dissimulent; sese interea, quando optima Dido

nesciat et tantos rumpi non speret amores,

temptaturum aditus et quae mollissima fandi

tempora, quis rebus dexter modus. ocius omnes

imperio laeti parent et iussa facessunt.  

          With 50 entries, we almost matched the record-breaking number of last year; once again 15 schools entered candidates.  The high standard of entries continued, particularly in the Junior and Intermediate sections.  We were impressed by the hard work that had clearly been put in by students and teachers to prepare the readings.  We continue to set long passages, which need thorough rehearsal before recording in order to sustain a winning performance.

 The best entrants read with no hesitations or stumbles at all.  Generally candidates pronounced the sounds of Latin well, with its characteristic pure vowels.  We try to choose passages with dramatic moments and a variety of mood, and candidates who responded to this were rewarded.

 Suggestions for improvement:

         The focus again for this year was quantities, and we were a little disappointed at how many errors were made with long and short vowels.  This is absolutely basic to correct pronunciation of Latin and the texts provided make clear which vowels are long.

 English ‘yew’ for ‘u’ turned up again, and English pronunciation of names crept in (Die-do for Dido, Eee-nee-us for Aeneas).  The sigh of ‘heu’ also tripped up several candidates (pronounce it ‘hay-oo’).

        Our focus next year will be accentuation of words: the accent in Latin goes on the penultimate syllable if this is ‘heavy’ or long, and the antepenultimate if the penultimate is ‘light’ (short).  Mistakes were made particularly with forms of verbs: spect'ābant, dēser'uerant, re'linquere.

This needs to be observed even when reading poetry.  

        Elisions in poetry can be difficult to deal with, and we suggest that they are not made mechanically when this interferes with the sense or phrasing of the words.  For example, it seems better to pronounce both syllables in ‘comae et’, ‘monitu imperio’ or ‘classem aptent’; on the other hand one could comfortably lose the vowel in ‘prima exordia’ or ‘atque animum’.  There is rich evidence that the Romans did not fully elide, i.e. drop, final long vowels but shortened them (correption).

        There were fewer examples of enjambment between lines of poetry in this year’s passage.  Very many candidates observed it very well; failing to make appropriate enjambement suggests uncertainty about the meaning.  Elisions are never made between lines (‘furentem audeat’) – well, almost never and certainly not here!

 Do listen to the winning entries to get an idea of the approaches that we rewarded.  And please do continue to enter in future years!

 

Hilary Walters, John Hazel



Junior Text:

Cambridge Latin Course Stage 18 p102

 ‘pro taberna Clementis’ lines 12-34

 (‘Eutychus cachinnans ... inquit Clemens.’)

https://www.clc.cambridgescp.com/sites/www.cambridgescp.com/files/legacy_root_files/singles/expall2/expnew.html?fn=ets2uk25&mn=1543945527