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The Association for Latin Teaching

ARLT






ARLT Summer School  1996



Held at Lord Wandsworth College, Long Sutton, Hook

Directed by Mr R Davies

CONSUMER REPORT 1


All the usual excitements of conferences and courses were present: soft single beds; name badges you pretend you've lost; finding the nearest pub as soon as possible; the obligatory excursion to a place of interest - this year Fishboume Palace; generally acting silly at the final night concert - though "Winnie the Pooh" was superbly acted in Latin.


So what about the important academic elements, I hear you ask - the lectures, option groups and reading groups? There were so many to choose from I can comment on only a few. Ideas gained from sessions on classroom games proved entertaining at the time and have been extremely usefull since; the "Latin into Italian" course was more for budding etymologists than for those about to go on holiday; some excellent discussion and notes on Tacitus Annals XIV; and I heard, though I find it hard to comprehend, that the prose composition class was "great"!


Lectures ranged from the comical to thought-provoking with many other emotions in between: Richard Woff insisted that children remember more about museum trips than what was in their lunch and who was sick on the bus; David Tristram outlined the importance of keeping classics in the curriculum and some ideas to help achieve this; Dr Jenny March brought her "Greek mythology" alive with a slide show; Maria Wyke revealed the different faces of Cleopatra through time, even using a video successfully! Who says classicists aren't capable of dealing with technological advances?


Despite all of the above we still somehow found the time to swim, play tennis, sing and act (after a fashion) and, of course, eat and drink well (in both quantity and quality). Though a week of the summer holidays, it was valuable refreshment for my own academia and for my pupils' learning since, and I was hugely glad to discover that you don't have to be ancient or clever or know how to pronounce Latin correctly!

Congratulations to all involved in the organisation. Hope to see you next year.

Litini Newcombe


CONSUMER REPORT 2


Where do Latin teachers go in summer? If any of our fans, disguised as pupils, had enquired, they might have been astonished — to Latin Summer School of course! (More accurately, classical summer school.)

At time of writing, it is six months since the ARLT 1996 Summer School held at Lord Wandsworth College,Hampshire. That itself is an excellent test — out of the multitudinous memories, what remains? A vast amount; the glorious setting of the College, superb food, so many bright, friendly and interesting people, quite a few of them first-timers, endless conversation, a lot of humour, encouragement and help, new knowledge, priceless contacts, a swimming pool, a great day in Fishbourne and Chichester, a fabulous Gourmet Dinner. The final evening's entertainment is a kind of summing up; music, plays, fun and talent, great humour, good company, all informed by much real scholarship lightly worn, and all introduced by our genial presiding M/C, alias the Course Director, dressed most suitably for the occasion .


The list of events for 1997 gives a clue to the rich programme on offer. For classicists, it is rather like being set free in a sweet shop. Where to start? ARLT was true as ever to its aim of promoting correct Latin (and Greek) pronunciation — a beautiful and so rarely heard sound — yet no-one need feel intimidated, as people are very kind in helping. We heard some latest scholarship, often with illustrations, from academics, as well as Cambridge and other course developments. The reading and option groups offer practical and syllabus help.


The week is both practical and inspirational. It is truly encouraging to meet others with the same problems and pleasures of our classical craft. About 50 people as well as lecturers attended, giving up six days in their precious summer holidays. Yet 'giving up' is hardly the phrase, as the ARLT Summer School is always a great pleasure. This year, among other attractions, we saw work in progress at Fishbourne and heard the archaeological results, some time before they were announced in the press.


Please do give it a try, if you have not been before. If you have, see you again! We promise a warm welcome, compatible interests, hard work yes, but creative and interesting, no compulsion (people attend as much or little as they like), friendly encouragement and a memorable time. Scattered impressions, long ago remembered, hardly do justice to such a School, but they do linger. The strength and value received last over the year, and indeed longer. I still remember my first ARLT Summer School, Exeter 1993, with all the fondness of Horace for his four-year old summer wine, which nourishes still in winter. For classicists, in difficult times, these are great conferences.

Many thanks especially to the Director, Roger Davies, for Summer School 1996. It was a beautifully organised and splendid week.

Michael Northey Kent College Canterbury


ORATIO VALEDICTORIA MCMXCVI

Roger Davies

O Arelates - insolitus ut sum publice dicendi ita et gaudeo tot auditores tam doctos conspiciens et lugeo quod hic cursus meus paene est perfectus. nam hos quinque dies intentissime audivistis, suavissime cecinistis, labores libentissime suscepistis. neque ullos novi viros - nec mehercule feminas - incundiore hilariores et, ut dicit Catullus noster, venustiores. forsitan igitur vobis pauca de studiis nostris audire placeat: quod animus non horret meminisse (mirabile dictu!) incipiam.

primum omnium Ricardus (1)' ille qui latrat nos tam lepide docuit quid nobis esset agendum in Museis cum discipulis nostris. tum professor ille Scintilla (2), vir summi ingenii, disertissime nobis adhibuit imagines mirabiles in harena deserta inventas quas nos* Aegyptii olim pinximus. eheu! venit enim mihi in mentem recordatio de amicis meis Barbillo et Aristone qui illic perierunt.

postridie mane poster amicus Tristramus (3) sine faecibus taurorum disseruit quemadmodum lingua Latina ad curricula nostra accommodaretur his temporibus minime cultis. inde ille Professor Cantabrigiensis (4) facundissime nobis locutus est de illo Nerone eripiendo. puto tamen Cornelium Tacitum cum sententiis eius consensurum fuisse. tum ille qui est doctus (5) monumentis antiquitatis nobis ostendit picturas aulae ubi fortasse habitabat rex Cogidubnus. postridie mane situs ipse et officina discipulorum nos maxime delectaverunt.

gratias quoque illi doctori Martiis (6) (vel `iter fac' !) qui nobis picturas de historiis fabulosis Graecorum ostendit et quomodo pictores poetasque Britannicos affecerint.

neque ullo modo tacere velim de illa Maria (7) quae nobis demonstravit picturas et tabulas moventes de illa regina Cleopatra factas ab amicis nostris trans Oceanum habitantibus.

postrema nec minima illa Patricia Historia (8), quae nobis tam saepe est locuta, nos certiores fecit de omnibus novis illius cursus Cantabrigiensis quem paene nos omnes tam profunde amamus.


gratias ago maximas omnibus magistris et magistratibus qui alios magistros magistrasque docebant. quot ingenia in societate nostra habemus - erant multi circuli diversi, scaenae - quo genere spectaculi maxime teneor - musica canora, sacerdotibus (9) regentibus et claviculis sonantibus.

velim vos omnes nominatim commemorare sed tempus iam fugit. non possum abire tamen sinc paucis verbis de coquis nostris (10). quas cenas sumptuosissimas nobis praebuerunt, praecipue heri vesperi. Trimalchio ipse eam amavisset. nec obliviscar illius secundae mensae panis butyriique!

nunc denique paene ad perorationem adveni; unum tamen restat quod dicam: quantam voluptatem, quantam hilaritatem quantum auxilium mihi dederitis. ut dixit Plinius noster, quantum lusimus, risimus, studuimus.

spero vos omnes ferias iucundissimas acturos, domum incolumes perventuros. valete: qualis artifex abeo!


ROGER DAVIES (Course Director) St. Swithun's School, Winchester.



1 Richard Woff gave a talk on Children and Museums.

2 Professor Brian Sparkes spoke on Egyptian Mummy Portraits.

3 David Tristram

4 Dr. Chris Kelly spoke on `Nero - a Rescue Mission'.

5 David Rudkin the archaeologist at Fishbourne and a visit to the site next day.

6 Dr. Jenny March showed slides on Greek Mythology.

7 Maria Wyke spoke on Cleopatra.

8 Pat Story on `Recent Developments in the CSCP'.

9 David Parsons, President of ARLT.

10 The catering was of an unusually high standard.

* At this point the Director was attired as an Egyptian, being just about to sing the Cleopatra song from `Salad Days'!