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The Association for Latin Teaching

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ARLT Summer School 1963



held at College of Technology, Loughborough

Directed by Mr J.R.C. Richards

THE 40th SUMMER SCHOOL, LOUGHBOROUGH


A Symposium


Since “divide and rule”  is a practical doctrine and no one can be in two places at once, this is a symposium of the impressions of a variety of people on the multitudinous activities of the Summer School.  The course, which was bigger than ever, was held in the College of Advanced Technology.

We began each day with the basic first year demonstration class brilliantly taken by Mrs. F.B.K. Dennis.  Her class was 19 girls of mixed ability from a local Grammar School who had learnt French for a year.  Mrs Dennis,using techniques involving eggs, lollipops, crocodiles and a considerable acting ability, made her pupils quickly and efficiently alive to the importance of endings.  Five weekswork were compressed skilfully and entertainingly into five lessons.  Any doubts newcomers may have had of the value and success of the method were quickly dispelled - utinam animis et eius et omnium magistrorum adessent illa vis, illa lepos Dennisensis.

Mr Gravett’s talents go beyond those of a mere teacher of the Latin language.  In hs demonstration lessons with boys and girls in their second year Latin he revelaed to us histrionic and artistic talents as well.  His pictures on the board and his imitation of Latin words were an enormous help to his pupils.  When Mr. Gravett became “laetus”  no one could have the least doubt what the word meant and “feles murem edit” became a most dramatically acted sentence.

Mr. Gravett showed us how quickly one could teach the relative from a knowledge of is, ea, id and his quick fire questions showed the efficacy of the direct method.  To an observer who had never seen this method in action before, it was most interesting to see how the whole whole atmosphere of the class became absorbingly Latin.

This year there were  three Prose classes.  The elementary, taken by Miss Mardel was for those who wished to discuss the bridge at “O” level from sentences to continuous prose.  Miss Mardel suggested an approach that allowed the pupils to use immediately the Latin at their command.  The aim was reasoable fluency rather than polish.  Improving connections and alternative word order were added during a second reading of the translated version.

Intermediate Prose, taken by Mr. Boyd, dealt with the new, difficilt world of Latin Prose Composition in the Lower VI.  The prose chosen for translation gave ample illustration of the pitfalls or ornate, ambiguous English.  Although the class sometimes lapsed in thoughtful meditation and were willing to accept the given version, there were phrases which provoked much voluble and interesting dissension.  We left not only with most of next year’s homework prepared but also with much gratitudeto Mr. Boyd for hos kindly encouragement and help.

Mr.Melluish in his class engaged the more “advanced pupils” and their Lewis and Shorts in a display of gymnastic erudition.  Phrases, suggestions, alternatives flew like sparks from crossed swords.  All this was accompanied by the dovelike flutter of pages to check Cicero.  

Mr. Wilmott took advanced and Mr. Richards elementary verse composition.  The expedition to Leicester was not a success.  “Adhaesit anima mea pavimento,” said Mr Dale.  But the beauty of Belgrave Hall did much to compensate the discomforts of the early afternoon.

The Circuli and Reading classes were varied from the sonorous tones of Mr. Eagling and mellifluous Greek of Dr. Morgan to the practical purposes of Miss Wood and Miss Mardel.

Miss Wood, dealing with the second year of Latin followed naturally after Mrs. Dennis.  The spectators had become “the pupils”.  It was an illuminating but sobering experience, to realise how alert one had to be to avoid stupid blunders with the Future and Future Perfect.

Miss Mardel took “O” level Unseen Translation.  Various methods of diminishing the aversion of the average pupil to selected passages were discussed.  The necessity of two verbal  readings was agreed upon - there was less unanimity on the use of familiar methods such as brackets to mark offdependent clauses. Miss Mardel stressed the value of getting the class to grasp the general meaning of a passage, irrespective of accurate translationand of  encouraging the weaker members first to choose a phrase which they could attempt to translate.  Mr. Diamond conducted the Caesar in his inimitable way.

Those who yearly await Mr. Dale’s literary spotlight, this year fluttered with Aristophanes’ Birds, sensing the shades of rhythm severing comic from tragic iambics, grasping the need for a second parabasis and threading the maze of choric metres with their various bases and uses illustrated by glimpses  of his translation into syllabic precision in quantitive English.  The cloud cuckooland of the Sicilian Expedition where Athenian Demos thought to hold the Everlasting Verities to ransom, reminded some youngsters of Dieppe, their elders of Gallipoli.  Finall the Father of Farce walked again when Mr. Dale equally brilliant as an actor, produced himself and others in the embassy scene.

Both summer school lectures expressed, as they ought, the vivacity of Classical studies.

Mr. Cobhan’s delivery was taut and full of nervous energy.  His approach to the Classicslies in the sudden revelation of permanence and eternal aptness: in Bedouin folk-memories of Roman campaigns, in the Roman landscapes of Lincolnshire: the etymology of “panties” is to him as relevant as the logistics of a cross-Channel invasion.

Mr Wilkinson was a suave guide to the common speech of ancient Rome - the world where a man could be jolly fat (belle corpulentus) and have the wherewithal (habet unde).   He was at home with the nouveaux-riches of Cumae and the lady tourist on Mount Sinai.  His speech proved yet again that an arbiter of elegance must also be a connoisseur of vulgarity.

No story of the school is finished without mention of how, for most of us, the days ended with Mr. Dunn as true “Master of the Revels”.   We give him our deepest thanks for providing the entergetic complement  to so many intellectual stimuli.  In addition, he produced his own translation of  “The  Merchant Eyes the Merchandise” (Plautus Mercator) for the greater hilarity of a course well fed in every way.

The debate on Sunday had not only a display of provocative erudtion from the four speakers but also some scintillating wit from the floor.

The Dinner


The Jubilee Dinner was a brilliant crown where the wit of the retiring President, Mr. Rees, matched that of Mr. Dale, the new President, and the sparkling of the flowing wine.  Five other Vice-Presidents attended: Miss Woodward, Miss Croft, Mrs. Newey, Mr. Melluish, Mr. Rowe; Miss Billing, Mr. Peckett and Mr. Munday sent apologies, and the following message from Professor Haahoff was read aloud: -

SALVETE, ARELATES!  MIHI QUIDEM SOCIETATE AMICISSIMA CONIVNCTI, QUAMVIS ME FATA INVIDA LONGE ARCEANT, SEMPER MEMORIA GRATA CONCILIA NOSTRA RECOLERE GAVDEO.  DUX OLIM ILLE NOSTER, PRAECEPTOR DOCTISSIMVS ATQUE CARISSIMVS, W.H.D. ROUSE, NUNQVAM EX ANIMO MEO EXCIDET; SEMPER ENIM STVDIA NOSTRA INLVSTRAVIT INLVSTRATQVE.  ILLIVS PRAECEPTA IN HONORE HABEAMVS, ILLIVS DOCTRINAM PROMOVEAMVS, QVASI CVRSORES LAMPADA TRADAMVS !

ET VOS,  IVNIORES,NEC STVDIO NEC ARTE DEFICIENTES, SGNA HUMANITATIS FORTITER FERENTES, FELICITER PROGRESSI BARBAROS ILLOS TEMPORIS NOSTRI TERGA VERTERE COGATIS !

VIVANT, FLOREANT ARELATES FOEDERE SANE UNIVERSO CONIVNCTI.  VALETE !

T.J. Haarhoff

AD UNIVERSITATEM WITWATERSRANDENSEM

IOANNISBURGIAE

IN AFRICA AUSTRALI                                   Mense Iulio    anno MDCCCCLXIII


The following verses appeared on the menu:

LUSTRA DECEM FUGIUNT: RESTANT CONLEGIA NOSTRA:

HAEC LINVUAE CAVSA CONSOCIATA MANENT.

RVRSVS CONVENVNT ARELATES: LVDUS HABETVR

AESTIVUS: MELIVS CVNCTA DOCERE VOLVNT.

PERGAMVS, SOCII, LINGVAM COLER VSQUE LATINAM:

DISCIPVLVS NOBIS INSTITVENDVS ERIT.

NVNC BIBITE, O SOCII: CENA EST AVDACTER EDENDA:

ANTE ALIAM FVGIENT ALTERA LVSTRA DECEM.                J.R.


and the following were added on the spot:

LUSTRA DECEM FUGIVNT: EPVLIS CELEBRAMVS OPIMIS

GESTA PRIORA VIRVM PRAETERITOSQUE DIES.

UT NOSTRI LIBVIT ROSCI MEMINISSE REPERTA!

INDE NOVAM REPERIT LINGVA LATINA VIAM.

CROFTA MAGISTRA ADERAT, DALUSQVE ET SILVIA NOSTRA:

ERGO AGIMUS GRATES, CARE RICARDE, TIBI.               A.W.E.

ORATIO VALEDICTORIA


            Investiganti mihi , O Arelates, et evolventi libros antiquos in quibus continentur Latinae docendae antiquae, non directorem ludi aestivi orationem  valedictoriam habere antiquitus solitum esse sed praesidem huius societatis nuper apparuit.   Nihilominus his novissimis temporibus aetati avis tanto ut ludi director hoc munere perfungatur.  Itaque pro virili parte orationem brevem apud vos habere conabor.  Quamquam est in hoc ludo, quae se malle orationem valetudinariam quam valedictoriam audire affirmaverit.

              Ante omnia fortasse licet mihi duos quosdam nominatim vobis in mentem redigere: alteram Margaritam nostram, quam paene ausim - salva scilicet reverentia - magni pretii dicere: naque illa remota quid omnino in hoc ludo aetsivo facere potuissemus equidem plane ignoro: alterum Finitum, quo ducente haec aula - quae nomen a pontifice harum insularum maximo ducit, quippe qui insulam Monam cum terra continenti coniunxerit et apud Pontycysylite rivum aquae ut dicere solebant indigenae per caelum duxerit - quo ducente, dico, haec aula barbaris clamoribus iterum atque iterum resonuit.

Sed his rebus dictis quid est quod apud vos dicam?  Declaramne vobis quot epistulas in hoc ludo aestivo ordinando scripserim?  an de lampadibus per totam Europam deficientibus disseram?  An de Gothis vel Getis ad portas stantibus?  An ad numeros me conferam - non versus dico neque modos nedum cantica - illud tantum requiro quot viri et feminae priore tempore his ludivis aestivis interesse soliti sint.  L abhinc  annos ducenti fere praeceptores aderant : XL vero abhinc annos quinquaginta unus vel fortasse quinquaginta una: naque duodecim soli in tot Arelatibus viri ludo aestivo tum intererant.  V post annis, scilicet anno Domini nostri MCMXXVIII aderant quinquaginta septem.  Hoc anno plures sumus quam septuaginta nec pauciores duodecim abhinc menses inter Silures convenerunt.  Numeri tamen huiusmodi sicut numeri poetarum dicere possunt quidquid nos volumus.

              His sex diebus,  O Arelates, in hoc ludo aestivo nostrae societatis quadragensimo amoenissimis in locis et ad haec studia maxime idoneis sub caelo autem eheu quam tristi et minitanti in “campo”, quod ego “collem” nuncupare velim, quid fecimus?

              Primum omniam Belindam nostram audiimus undeviginti puellas linguam Latinam ratione sane nostrae societati per multos annos bene nota, modo autem si distinguere mihi licet omnino sibi ipsi (vae mihi, nonne clarius appareret quid significare velim si mihi liceret sibi ipsae dicere)  proprio docentem.

              Deinde Gravidum nostrum - Laocoonta quendam crederes - vidimus, qui haudquaquam reluctari volebant  eis luctari, sed vix quidquam intra annum didicisse videbantur in quo ut in fundamine lateres illenoster poneret.  Aedificium tamen mea quidem sententia tamen apparuit.  Unde videre possumus neminem esse in praeceptorum numero, quin aliquando luctari ei necesse sit.

              Necnon orator illustris Cantabrigiensis docuit nos quomodo inter se ei colloquerentur qui vix unquam quidquam nisi Latine dicerent.  Qui vero scholae Abingdoniensi praesidet, ille nobiscum non solum ioca sed et seria celebravit.

              Quid de Dalio dicam nostro nunc iterum huius societatis praeside?  Quis alius quarter nec saepius nos allocutus tantum nobis declarare potuit de concinnitate omnium quae Aristophanes choro suo in fabula illa concentu avium ut dixit noster omnino repleta pronuntianda commisit.

              Quid multa?  Ut paullulum variem quae dicere solet in fine ludi Aestivi Arturus noster - circuli circulabantur - ita est in vocabulario - recitatores recitabant, sermonem paene latinum scribebant scriptores, disputatores disputabant, cantatores cantabant, Wilbur wersibus exqwisitissimis Wilburabat, postremo - quod haudquaquam minimi momenti est - saltatores saltabant.

              Et nihil - fortasse  rogatis - de Ratis Coritanorum?  Nihil.  Finem faciam, O Arelates, si hoc tantum adiecero: si ad linguam Latinam docendam vel pauxillulum recreati revenietis, non frustra laboraverint qui his sex diebus vel docendo vel dicendo vel administrando operam dederint.  Gratias ago vobis quam maximas, qui nos omnes tam benigne et tam attente audivistis.  Sedeo.